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Friday
Mar132015

Lifestyle Lift Abruptly Shuts Down

According to the Better Business Bureau's website, Lifestyle Lift is believed to be out of business.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the company, which claims to offer a “minor one-hour procedure with major results,” abruptly shut down a majority of its 40 surgery centers Monday and announced it would consider filing for bankruptcy.

The company, founded in 2001 by Dr. David Kent, had 40 surgery centers nationwide offering what it billed as a less-invasive face-lift procedure that required only local anesthesia and a shorter recovery time. Its advertisements boasted that the services are affordable for everyday people who want to “look as young on the outside as you feel on the inside.”

In a letter to employees sent Sunday and reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, Dr. Kent said the company “has made the decision to temporarily cease operations until further notice.” The letter tells employees not to report to work “until further notice unless otherwise instructed.”

In a letter sent to employees over the weekend, Dr. David Kent – the founder of the company – said he made the “decision to temporarily cease operations until further notice.”

“The future of the Company is uncertain and therefore it is currently developing both a wind down plan to close the business and a reorganization plan to accommodate a new investment,” the letter states.

A spokesperson for Michigan-based Lifestyle Lift tells the WSJ that the company is considering its options, one of which is filing for bankruptcy.

As of Monday, Lifestyle Lift is only providing some post-operation checkup procedures.

As one of the 'franchise model' cosmetic medicine businesses Lifestyle Lift saw dramatic growth before a series of setbacks. In 2008 it sued Realself for allowing negative reviews to be posted on the site. Realself countersued claiming that Lifestyle Lift employees were posting fake counter-reviews in violation of the sites user agreement (commonly known as 'astroturfing').

Santa Clara University School of Law professor Eric Goldman, who advised RealSelf on the case, posted about the issue on his personal blog:

No matter how many times I see it–and in the Internet era, I see it all too frequently–I always shake my head in disappointment and frustration when a company uses trademark law to lash out against unflattering consumer reviews. To these companies, trademark law is a cure-all tonic for their marketplace travails, and trademark doctrine is so plastic and amorphous that defendants have some difficulty mounting a proper defense. As a result, all too frequently, the threat of a trademark lawsuit causes the intermediary to capitulate and excise valuable content from the Internet.

In its answer, RealSelf goes on the offensive and alleges that Lifestyle Lift directly or indirectly posted shill reviews to the Lifestyle Lift discussion, thereby breaching RealSelf’s user agreement. Off the top of my head, I can’t think of another lawsuit where the message board operator sued a company for shill postings, so I think this case may be breaking important new legal ground.

The bruhaha led to an investigation by the New York Attorney General’s office and in 2009, then-attorney general Andrew Cuomo announced Lifestyle Lift would pay $300,000 and stop posting fake reviews online.

Cuomo said in a statement at the time that Lifestyle Lift’s “attempt to generate business by duping consumers was cynical, manipulative and illegal.”

Monday
Mar092015

Getting Naked on the Internet: What does the law say?

Telemedicine and Cyber Security

The Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is a federal law that protects the privacy of your personal health information (PHI). HIPAA includes several rules and provisions that set guidelines and requirements for the administration and enforcement of HIPAA. The relevant ones for the exchange of PHI in the digital cyberspace are the Privacy Rule1, the Security Rule2, and the aptly named Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act3.

Telemedicine is a burgeoning field of medicine that incorporates digital technology such as electronic health records (EHR), information sharing, and videoconferencing to enhance the interaction between physicians and their patients, and ultimately, improve the delivery of healthcare. Having been a plastic surgeon for several years now, I’m all too familiar with meeting people at social events, and immediately getting bombarded with intrusive and unusual questions and requests as soon as my chosen profession is ousted. Sure, it’s unlikely that a woman will disrobe and expose herself in front of me and my wife at a friend’s dinner party, but get us into an online “private” videoconference call, and who knows what body parts will make an abrupt entrance into the conversation. Physicians must approach with caution, says American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) President Stephen S. Park, M.D. in a recent article4. But, for me and most physicians I know, I feel like the cat is already out of the bag. Considering the amount of texts, emails, online chats, phone conversations over internet and satellite lines, and selfies of both pre- and post-op patients I’ve been privy to, I’m sure I’ve already broken too many laws, and completely disregarded the good doctor’s advice. The truth is, though, that we’ve only begun to scratch the surface.

Telemedicine may involve the electronic exchange of PHI which is protected under HIPAA law. Security considerations with telemedicine involve making sure unauthorized third parties cannot eavesdrop on or record a videoconferencing session where sensitive PHI is transmitted seamlessly, and unfortunately, innocently. Recently, a monumental data breach at one of the nation’s largest insurance providers has spurred a bipartisan political effort to reexamine HIPAA as it relates to telemedicine, possibly adding costly and cumbersome requirements to encrypt EHR data5. Additionally, a recent report done by BitSight Technologies, a cyber security risk analysis and management firm, found that healthcare and pharmaceutical companies ranked the lowest among the four industry categories studied6. Suffice it to say, people are taking heed of this emerging new threat.

The aforementioned laws, rules, and regulations guide the generation, maintenance, and implementation of telemedicine HIPAA compliance. We must be cautioned, though, that HIPAA compliance does not necessarily equate to actual cyber security, and that simply meeting standards set forth in these regulations may not be enough. As more public attention and scrutiny rise to the forefront of media exposure, look for the healthcare industry to take the cyber security threat much more seriously.

Daniel Kaufman, MD
Discreet Plastic Surgery

Bibliography
1. http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/privacyrule/
2. http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/securityrule/
3. http://www.healthit.gov/policy-researchers-implementers/health-it-legislation-and-regulations
4. http://cosmeticsurgerytimes.modernmedicine.com/cosmetic-surgery-times/news/cosmetic-virtual-consult
5. http://medicaleconomics.modernmedicine.com/medical-economics/news/senate-review-hipaa-security-medical-records-light-anthem-breach
6. http://info.bitsighttech.com/bitsight-insights-industry-security-ratings-vol-4-rc

Thursday
Feb122015

Medical Headlines

A few headlines of interest. Make sure to read the Venture Beat article on the FDA taking a hands-off approach to digitial health. That may have an effect on the concierge physicians and medical spas that are beginning to use more sophisticated methods to deliver care at distance.

Apple's HealthKit Takes Early Lead Among Top Hospitals
Reuters

Health Insurer Anthem Didn’t Encrypt Data In Theft
The Wall Street Journal

FDA Makes Official Its Hands-Off Approach To Regulating Digital Health
VentureBeat

This Insurer's Price Tool Could Shake Up The Medical Industry
Kaiser Health News

Mobile Health Will Move From Educational To Delivering Care In Five Years
MobiHealthNews

Patient Ratings Not Linked To Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Reuters

Smartphone Test For HIV And Syphilis Costs Pennies
Technology Review

Thursday
Feb052015

Could new research in cognition effect cosmetic medicine?

Clevermind I/O is allowing researchers to build new data-driven models of cognition and mental health.

Facebook is tracking your interests and selling you to advertisers. Google does something similar. How granular can it get? It's possible that new technologies might allow to build cognitive models that have never been seen before... Take a look at Clevermind I/O

If we could predict decision making, performance and behaviors in humans with at least pretty decent accuracy, what would that mean for cosmetic medicine? Could we use new tools that could slice and dice way that humans think, and how they feel?

Right now Clevermind I/O is providing a suite of technology tools that researchers have never had access to, and they're doing it for free.

Could we use facial recognition tools and facial mapping to make better decisions about how fillers will change a the shape of a patients lips? Could we identify the patients who are most likely to be unhappy or sue? Could we track changes over time?

I don't know what might come from the combination of human interactions and assessments with machine learning. Perhaps our machine overloards do.

Thursday
Dec182014

Connecticut Passes New Medical Spa Bill Requiring More Medical Oversight

Conneticut has passed new laws for medicals spas that requires all medical spas to employ on staff or by contract a physicain, PA or APRN and that those oversight providers make an assessment before any medical proceedure.

The law also ends some practices like "Botox parties" where there's often a party atmosphere (sometimes including alchol) that can affect consent practices. 

Most medspas already operate according to these types of standards and these measures are actually targeting the king of treatments that are offered in hair salons and day spas.

Here's the law. Link

Connecticut Seal - Medical Spa Bill

Substitute Senate Bill No. 418 | Public Act No. 14-119

AN ACT CONCERNING THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH'S RECOMMENDATIONS CONCERNING MEDICAL SPAS.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Assembly convened:

Section 1. (NEW) (Effective October 1, 2014) (a) For purposes of this section:

(1) "Medical spa" means an establishment in which cosmetic medical procedures are performed; and

(2) "Cosmetic medical procedure" means any procedure performed on a person that is directed at improving the person's appearance and that does not meaningfully promote the proper function of the body or prevent or treat illness or disease and may include, but is not limited to, cosmetic surgery, hair transplants, cosmetic injections, cosmetic soft tissue fillers, dermaplaning, dermastamping, dermarolling, dermabrasion that removes cells beyond the stratum corneum, chemical peels using modification solutions that exceed thirty per cent concentration with a pH value of lower than 3. 0, laser hair removal, laser skin resurfacing, laser treatment of leg veins, sclerotherapy and other laser procedures, intense pulsed light, injection of cosmetic filling agents and neurotoxins and the use of class II medical devices designed to induce deep skin tissue alteration.

(b) Each medical spa shall employ or contract for the services of: (1) A physician licensed pursuant to chapter 370 of the general statutes; (2) a physician assistant licensed pursuant to chapter 370 of the general statutes; or (3) an advanced practice registered nurse licensed pursuant to chapter 378 of the general statutes. Each such physician, physician assistant or advanced practice registered nurse shall: (A) Be actively practicing in the state; and (B) have received education or training from an institution of higher education or professional organization to perform cosmetic medical procedures and have experience performing such procedures. Any cosmetic medical procedure performed at a medical spa shall be performed in accordance with the provisions of titles 19a and 20 of the general statutes, and shall only be performed by such physician, physician assistant or advanced practice registered nurse, or a registered nurse licensed pursuant to chapter 378 of the general statutes.

(c) A physician, physician assistant or advanced practice registered nurse who is employed by, or under contract with, the medical spa shall perform an initial physical assessment of each person undergoing a cosmetic medical procedure at the medical spa prior to such procedure being performed.

(d) Each medical spa shall post information, including the names and any specialty areas of any physician, physician assistant, advanced practice registered nurse or registered nurse performing cosmetic medical procedures, in a conspicuous place that is accessible to customers at the medical spa and on any Internet web site maintained by the medical spa. Such information shall also be: (1) Contained in any advertisement by the medical spa or state that such information may be found on the medical spa's Internet web site and list the address for such Internet web site; and (2) contained in a written notice that is provided to each person before undergoing any cosmetic medical procedure at the medical spa.

Monday
Dec082014

The 2015 Telemedicine Report

2015 Telemedicine Report from Freelance MD2015 Telemedicine Report from Freelance MD

The 2015 Telemedicine Report: This report provides an overview of the current sentiment and opinion of telemedicine from the point of view of tens of thousands of clinicians and health care administrators all around the world. This report provides insights into providers’ opinions and the current level of opportunity for telemedicine to have an impact on the delivery of health care.

Download Telemedicine Report 2015

The Telemedicine Story: Telemedicine is in its infancy but poised to gain wider acceptance and usage as health care providers and markets realize its potential to both scale delivery of services and cut costs (efficiency) and drive greater revenue by removing friction from provider-patient interactions (scalability).

The current view of telemedicine is just beginning to become a topic of mainstream discussions and excitement is growing along with expectations. We're happy to have been able to work with Freelance MD to help generate the content for this report. (A special thanks for our Members who contributed.)

 

telemedicine adoption graph 2015

There are indications that this is beginning to happen as insurance companies and others see this as a way to provide high-value services at a more reasonable cost while keeping patients healthy and without the need for more expensive intervention treatments. For example, Arches Health Plan recently announced that it will reimburse providers for home-based telemedicine interactions. As this becomes more commonplace the few remaining impediments to adoption will be removed and telemedicine will begin to ramp from the realm of innovators and early adopters and towards the majority of providers.

telemedicine report

Market Opportunities

As with all emerging technologies telemedicine is going to disrupt some traditional models and put others out of business. Telemedicine is inherently more efficient, more predictable, and less costly than any current delivery of care. While it cannot replace actual interventional or hands-on care, it solves entire categories of wasteful informational visits and begins to provide a platform where every provider and patient has access to the very best information and care. Early adopters are already realizing this in as evidenced by adoption trends being more pronounced in cosmetic and concierge medicine (direct pay) than family and general practice (third party payer). Those providers who get out ahead of this macro-economic trend be best situated to capitalize on what will inevitably be a commercial marketplace with both winners and losers driven by the availability of big data and consumer choice.

Make sure that you take a look at our other free reports for Members here.

Friday
Oct242014

What makes you a Rock Star Physician?

medical spa brandingThe big shots are only the little shots who keep shooting. - Christopher Morley

It's determined through your output: the work you do, the products sell, the services you provide, and the content you create. It determines how much money you make, and how much control you can exert over your career and your lifestyle.

If you're not exercising, you'll lose muscle tone and gain fat. If you're not working on your own brand, it'll backslide too. Rest too long on your laurels and you run the risk of undoing all of your hard work and fading in to the background. If your behavior, attitude and output contradict your existing position, your real positioning will change.

You're not going to need much to get started, just and understanding of how all of this fits together (this guide), some thought about your goals, and the effort to take action. Once you've determined your capabilities and decided where you want to be, you should be able to manage everything in your head, and a few bookmarks in your browser.

Your goals and were you want to be are up to you. We're going to focus on what actions you need to take to get you there.

Success is measured in years, not months.

It pays to be obvious, especially if you have a reputation for subtlety. - Isaac Asimov

Building your personal brand is, in essence, self marketing. If you take a look at the most successful (or talked about) people in any field, you’ll almost always see someone incredibly talented in the art of self-promotion.

To build a personal brand that makes you a rockstar, it needs to have some key characteristics. It needs to be unique, scarce, and remarkable, and you need to be comfortable promoting it. Robert Kiyosaki, author of the Rich Dad Poor Dad books, says that he’s a “bestselling author” and not a “best-writing author.” Dean Karnazes, known as “The Ultramarathon Man,” is not the best athlete in his field, but he is by far the best at self-promotion.

What's the difference?

The reason that self-promotion works and self-adulation doesn't is because self-promotion is the art of spreading ideas, concepts, and a greater vision. Self-adulation is just the promotion of accomplishments, deeds that have already been done.

When you promote your ideas, you give people something to cheer for that they care about. You give people a cause to support. People, in many ways, are selfish. They promote the things that make them feel good. Your accomplishments aren’t likely to make them feel good, but your ideas do.

Your ideas might inspire hope, thought, or action . . . but as a general rule, good ideas inspire something.

People promote Oprah Winfrey because she makes them feel good. Her ideas inspire thought and that warm fuzzy feeling we all get when we make a sincere connection. On the other hand, you and I aren’t going around bragging about how many books she’s sold or how many shows she’s recorded. We don't care about that because it's the ideas that inspire . . . not the achievements.

Look at Muhammad Ali, one of the greatest self-promoters in history. He was followed not just because he truly was “the greatest,” but also for his integrity and the boldness of his ideas. Compare your feelings about Ali to your feelings about Mike Tyson. Tyson’s boxing accomplishments were arguably greater than Ali's, but he never communicated a greater vision.

Consider what your personal brand is right now. As a physician, what type of service you offer? Are you unique or replaceable? Are there a lot of competitors who offer the same basic service or product? Do people rush to introduce themselves to you? Is your name the one that's 'name dropped' ? Do you wield influence?

A lot of physicians get caught up in trying to pad their credentials or add another suffix after their name; MBA, board certifications, chairman of this or that. It may seem that being a 'specialist' may give you a head start. If you want to be unique, as our personal brand suggests, then we should go with specialization right? Not necessarily. Credentials by themselves won't make you a rockstar and they're no longer the 'end of the road' that gives you lifetime security. They only provide a minimum threshold to be include in a group. If you need to be included in that group for your career, go for it, but rockstar physicians don't deal in minimum thresholds. Groups put you in the middle where conformity is demanded. It's boring in the middle, and the very worst thing you can be is boring.

If you raise yourself above or put yourself outside the group you’ll take some flak. People might label you over-confident or cocky and demand that you tow the group line. Good. Define yourself in such a way that people either love you or hate you. If you have a vision, let it loose and see where it can take you.

Rockstar physicians are thought leaders, not followers.

Wednesday
Oct152014

"Botched" The Show On E Where Body Dysmorphic Disorder & Plastic Surgery Horror Becomes Entertainment.

Proving again that plastic surgery shows are really just another slow motion train wreck, E! launches "Botched" and proves that there's plenty of money to be made from BDD. 

Botched, which finds plastic surgery horror pateints who can only be described as 'weird', has got to be in or a short run.

Here's some of an article from Allure:

Botched is a show about fixing surgeries that have gone wrong, but the patients with warped noses, "uniboobs," bad butt implants, and body dysmorphic disorder are just featured players. The stars are the doctors, who dare to repair surgical disasters, which, if they do say so themselves, are 12s on a scale of 10 in difficulty. “This is a hero show,” says Dubrow in a video promo. If the patients don’t know what a good job the doctors have done, the docs are quick to exclaim at unveilings, “You look fantastic!”

...Dubrow and Nassif believe Botched is educating the public on the importance of researching doctors’ credentials. But the show’s real accomplishment is having incorporated all five of the recurring themes in plastic-surgery shows, as defined by Kathy Davis, a medical sociologist at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands: Before and afters, happy stories, sad stories, weird requests, and celebrities (if Janice Dickinson still counts). That's entertainment.

I've heard patients ask about shows like the Swan and even Nip/Tuck but it will be interesting to see where that goes with a show that focus's on the gross out factor and horror stories that botched details.

Thursday
Oct092014

Survey: Share your opinion of the future of telemedicine.

Take our 2 minute survey and share your thoughts and opinions about the future (or lack thereof) of telemedicine!

Telemedicine is gaining at least a toe-hold in health care at both ends of the health care spectrum. For some large hospital groups and insurers it offers an ability to scale with significant cost savings, and on the other end individual physicians like those in concierge and cosmetic practices are using telemedicine to stay in touch with patients and offer services on-demand.

If you're a physician, clinician or clinic/hospital administrator, we're asking you for a few minutes of your time to take this survey an answer a couple of simple questions to see what providers are thinking about telemedicine.

 

 

We'll aggregate the answers and create a report outlining the sentiment of physicians and other providers around telemedicine.

This survey is being run by our frends at Freelance MD but we'll share it with our Members. (If you're not a Member, join now.)

Here's a direct link to share with your networks: https://storyteller.typeform.com/to/CFMq33

Wednesday
Sep242014

Telemedicine Startups: TruClinic

TruClinic is delivering on the promise that telemedicine can finally get to work in health care.

I've mentioned TruClinic before and my guess is that you'll be hearing more about them since they look like they're starting to gain traction with larger providers who need to become more efficient in delivering care without lowering their standards or running afoul of compliance issues. TruClinic lets them do that by taking many patient interactions onine.

TruClinic has just been awarded a $50,000 prize as a "health venture with business solutions to challenges faced by patients and healthcare systems".

Here's the press release.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Sep242014

Laser & IPL Hair Removal Regulations In Dubai

As in other places in the world where regulatory bodies aren't keeping up with advancing technology, the Dubai Health Authority saw that cosmetic lasers and IPLs were being purchased by hair salons and spas and being used to treat patients.

It's interesting to see how different countries deal with regulation and just how much they use the regulatory bodies of the US, Canada and Europe as base lines to implement their own regulation.

Here's a link to the Dubai Health Authorities regulations for Laser and IPL hair removal wich is interesting both for what it includes, and what it doesn't:

The number of facilities offering to remove unwanted hair through the use of lasers or similar medical devices is growing in the Emirates of Dubai.

By adding non-invasive and minimally invasive therapies to the beauty saloons services, beauty saloons start to treat patients instead of treating clients. This regulation is intended to be the fundamental regulation that will govern patient safety in any facility providing laser or similar medical devices hair removal services in the Emirate of Dubai.

The persons, establishment, public or private facility shall cease laser hair removal services with effect from August 31st, 2011 if the facility did not meet the laser hair removal regulation requirements.

Sunday
Sep212014

5 Ways To Turn Negative Reviews Of Your Medical Spa Around

If you're a dermatologist, plastic surgeon or medspa you've probably and you've been in business for a while, you've probably had some comments or reviews posted about you online that are less than flattering.

Cosmetic medicine seems to suffer from 'perfection expectations' more than other practices and with the advent of the internet and patients increasingly savvy use of it, it's easy for a less than perfect outcome or lapse in customer service to become a public event that's driving away new patients and tarnishing your online reputation. 

It's important to remember that even when 20% of all medical spa reviews are fake, that these are actually opportunities that you can use to both expand your reach and come across as a real person (which can actually help you considerably), but before you start penning a groveling apology let's take a look at how we can do some comment-judo and see if we can't turn these hurtful words to our advantage.

Here are 7 things that you can do turn around negative reviews of your clinic or medspa.

1. If the criticism has merit, apologize fast and accept responsibility.

We've all dropped the ball in some way. The more 'real person' and human you seem the more forgiving others are. Respond quickly and mean it, then outline what you're going to do to fix it now and in the future. Getting this right will position you as a clinician who cares rather than a defensive and patronizing jerk.

Had to wait too long to see someone? Wouldn't match the other local medspa's pricing? Couldn't use a Groupon after the expiration date? Admitting a negative has a strong psychological association with the truth, and you can use a small admission to actually increase your trustworthiness. Just be sure to do it fast, completely, and without that hint of sarcasm or patronizing tone that can often creep in.

2: Use it as real feedback and an opportunity to improve.

The worst reviews are the middling reviews of three thats that don't illicit enough emoitional response to even let you know where you're falling short. At least a one star review and an outpouring of profanity lets you know that you have a real problem that you can address rather than a festering wound that goes unnoticed but is continually costing you patients and damaging your reputation. So, if you get lampooned, take it as an opportunity to track down the real issue.

From Shmula: Henry David Thoreau said “There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil for every one striking at the root.”  His statement was a commentary on the human condition but, I believe, describes quite well the state of most companies: companies launch initiatives that don’t actually attack root causes of business problems, instead their aim is on the branches — we need to pay Taiichi Ohno’s 5-Why’s a visit and remember that surgically attacking statistically validated root causes is the only way to solve problems, improve the customer experience, and improve the enterprise.

Taiichi Ohno is known to have said that “having no problems is the biggest problem of all.”  He viewed problems not as a negative but as a “Kaizen opportunity in disguise.”  Whenever problems arose, he encouraged his staff to investigate the problem at the source and to as “ask ‘why’ five times about every matter. Here's one of his favorite examples:

1. “Why did the robot stop?”
The circuit has overloaded, causing a fuse to blow.
2. “Why is the circuit overloaded?”
There was insufficient lubrication on the bearings, so they locked up.
3. “Why was there insufficient lubrication on the bearings?”
The oil pump on the robot is not circulating sufficient oil.
4. “Why is the pump not circulating sufficient oil?”
The pump intake is clogged with metal shavings.
5. “Why is the intake clogged with metal shavings?”
Because there is no filter on the pump.

The purpose here is to follow through and discover what's going wrong with your processes that can be fixed or improved. in many cases it's easy and relatively simple.

1. “Why did this patient feel the need to post a negative review?”
She was upset that she couldn't book her regular appointment for Botox.
2. “Why couldn't she book her regular Botox appointment?”
The front desk couldn't schedule her treatment at the time she requested.
3. “Why couldn't the treament be scheduled?”
The front desk software showed that there were no available appointments.
4. “Why were there no avialable appointments?”
The software won't make appointments of less than 15 minutes and won't allow double-booking.
5. “Why can't we double-book in the software?”
Because we haven't taken the time to change the settings in the software.

Perhaps that example doesn't fit you but the idea is clear. Track your issues back to the root with purpose and take care of them.

3: Overcompensate with your response.

Going overboard in your response can position you as someone who will do almost anything to please your patients. If you do it right you'll come across as one of the good guys who, even in the face of a disgruntled or angry patient, can respond with level-headed care. Using Twitter or Facebook to reach out to a (justifiably) disgruntled patient and offering them a free product, service or treatment (or more) is worth far less than it would cost for all the free advertising and congratulatory press you can get. Remember to be reasonable and don't pinch pennies or go so far overboard that it feels contrived.

If you are successful with this tactic you can reuse it across the board. Publish photos of this patient being treated in your medspa along with a few sentances and perhaps a testimonial (if you can win them back).

4: Humor always wins if it's done well.

Humor is the great equalizer that can take the sting out of any attack, especially if the attackers go overboard. Take a look at this video published by Bodyform in response to criticism on Facebook about periods being over-hyped with beauty shots.

In 2012, Bodyform received a well written complaint on their Facebook page lamenting how tampon adverts always presented an idyllic lifestyle rather than the less pleasant experience of real life... and his post was racking up likes. Instead of taking it lying down, Bodyform responded with a well-produced sarcastic apology that generated over five million views and received an overwhelmingly positive response.

5: Never leave it alone.

Any of the tactics above can work depending upon the circumstances, but the primary thing you want to do is make sure that you respond appropriately as soon as you're aware there's an issue. Any response is better than no response at all.

More reading:

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